This week’s running 20th to 26th July 2016

This is not the Magor Marsh

Despite the name, there was no marsh at all to be seen in Magor

This week was all about one thing: The Magor Marsh 10k.

3x 1600m at 10k pace

Tuesday beckoned with some sort of session, so I cobbled together 3x 1600m to try and familiarise myself again with 10k pace. There was some trepidation going into this, where 3:55/km was likely to feel alien after the weeks of 5k pace work with reps at half the distance.

The first rep was shaky with the turn after the reservoir wall going almost entirely into a headwind. 3:57/km came out of the other side; acceptable but I knew I could do better without the wind.

The second rep was much more like it with 3:53/km that required less effort once warmed up and without the wind to contend with. Surprisingly, the third rep felt remarkably similar and produced 3:53/km, despite going into a headwind again.

I definitely had enough inside me for another rep but the aim of the game was to simply sharpen up without overdoing it. Sunday was looking ever more promising!

Here’s the Garmin data for this session.

5k from work

Thank the lord for a tailwind, otherwise this would have been rather unpleasant on tired legs and an empty stomache…

Here’s the Garmin data for this run.

8 canal miles

I really wasn’t expecting this run to feel as good as it did. I ran tall and my glutes decided to spring back into action to further complement the already positive run.

I threw one fast mile into the return leg at half marathon pace. I wanted to get my stride working through a fuller, faster range along with keeping my body accustomed to a faster pace without knackering myself out. Last week’s extreme taper ahead of my 5k PB attempt clearly did not work, so this was moving towards the other extreme!

Here’s the Garmin data for this run.

Cannon Hill Parkrun

I managed to reach the bandstand ridiculously early to find Martin Foster on his lonesome. I’d not had a good natter with Martin in ages, so it was great to catch-up with him and his injury woes.

I was torn over how to approach Cannon Hill Parkrun. Did I want to run the 4k super-slow and then the final k super-fast? Or did I want to run at a slow, steady pace and lead a pace bus at around 22 or 23 minutes? Ultimately, I chose the former(ish).

I ran with Simon Bull, who had already said he wasn’t aiming for anything crazy, but was game to go with my plan of a slow-ish 4k followed-up by a fast final k.

We made our way through the field at a reasonably sedate 4:20/km for the first 2k, moving up to 4:14/km for the next 2k thereafter. For the final k, I wanted Simon to give it everything he had and brought him home with a 3:51 final split. We joked he just needed four more of those and a sub-20 5k was all his!

Carl Stainton, who was managing the finish funnel, did chastise me slightly for tackling the run at that combined pace, ahead of the race the next day. But he was forgiven considering he’d very kindly given Lis and I a bottle of fizz earlier that morning.

Here’s the Garmin data for this run.

Magor Marsh 10k 2015 review

For the full write-up of this year’s Magor Marsh 10k, please click here.

Time for this week’s entry from Mark Remy’s The Runner’s Rule Book:

Respect the rules of the track

Here’s a rule of thumb: If you have to hop a fence or squeeze through a gate in order to run on a track, it is not okay for you to run on that track.

What’s that? You say the track belongs to a public school, and your tax dollars pay for it? Sorry. Tax dollars pay for lots of stuff that is off-limits to the average civilian. The Oval Office, for instance.

No one else is there, and it’s a crime for such a fine track to go unused? Tell that to the folks who locked the place up and posted the NO TRESPASSING signs.

If you want to work out on a track, contact a local school and seek permission; they might just grant it. Or go through your friendly neighbourhood running club. They’ll likely have a list of publicly available tracks.

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