This week’s running – 28th of September to 4th of October 2015

Cardiff Half Marathon route

Time to put the training to good use at the Cardiff Half Marathon!

This week was all about final race prep for the Cardiff Half Marathon.

5k from work

I was certainly ready for the taper by Monday. Three heavy training weeks had taken their toll on me and I needed to feel perky again. With tired legs and a headwind slamming straight into me, this particular recovery run had me averaging 10:15 miles for possibly my slowest ever time from the office.

Here’s the Garmin data for this run.

1.5 miles at half marathon pace

This was the final hard run ahead of the Cardiff Half Marathon. I wasn’t going to get any fitter come Sunday, but I wanted my body to feel familiar with what race pace felt like, so hence this sharpener.

Much like on previous occasions, I completely misjudged which direction the wind was blowing; by running anti-clockwise around the reservoir, I ended up maximising my exposure to the headwind to make race pace feel much harder than it should have. I was reasonably confident that had I have completed a second lap, it would have felt easier once fully warmed up.

Here’s the Garmin data for this run.

Rest day

Rather than cover another 5k from the office on Wednesday, I opted for an evening of rest with some foam rolling to straighten out any kinks in my legs (far fewer than when I foam rolled on Monday!)

4 miles with strides

I went out to cover 4 miles along the canals with a handful of fast stretches to let my stride out, and as expected, I felt a bit sluggish there. My coordination was off after only one full rest day – the curse of the taper!

Here’s the Garmin data for this run.

Like the Wind magazine

Like the Wind

If anybody has a spare issue 1 for sale, let me know!

A guilty pleasure of mine is magazines. Being a guy that’s always had hobbies and interests, magazines have provided me reading material where books have so often tried and failed to get me reading. I have stacks and stacks of running magazines: Runner’s World, Running Fitness, Men’s Running, Running Times, Competitor. You name it and I’ve probably had a subscription to it at some point. Due to poor and repeated content, I cancelled them all apart from Running Times, which I now subscribe to digitally at £13 a year for 6 issues.

Last year some time, I remember hearing some hub-bub about a new kid on the block called Like the Wind. Published independently and overseen by running enthusiast and blogger, Simon Freeman (and his wife), it promised to be different from the rest. Rather than churn out the same material that many of the other running related magazines do, Like the Wind is a “collection of running stories”. I finally got my hands on two issues (purchased from the poshest newsagent I’d ever been to in London, with a further three issues purchased in Bath a week later) and I was immediately struck by how personal the magazine’s content felt. Each story read like it was the individual’s own column or blog, though possibly to never be repeated. The other thing that caught my eye was the overall look and feel of the magazine – the design was simply sublime. It’s the sort of thing that you would proudly have on a coffee table at home.

At £9 an issue, it ain’t cheap. But then it does only come out once every three months, so at £3 a month it’s more palatable with the promise of fresh content compared to the yearly churn that some of the more regular titles go through.

Newport Parkrun

Over the last couple of years, I’ve experimented with running a Parkrun the day before races. I’m still yet to fully commit to the camp of do run, or the camp of don’t run; the only conclusion I seem to have reached is that if I feel like running, then I shouldn’t fight the urge.

Lis and I woke up to a chilly morning – perfect running weather for somebody that relishes the cold! The management team of Swansea Bay Parkrun were in attendance, with their inaugural event due to take place in late October (24th to be precise, but they pleaded for people to not flock to the first run, so you didn’t see that date here…)

The order of the day was to simply cover 5k at a relaxed pace of somewhere between 7:30 and 7:45 per mile. It felt entirely at odds to be running 5k at such a restrained pace with people blowing up all around me (they had pacers provided). I finally let go of the reins in the closing straight for a 200m burn-up and a finishing time of 23:05.

Here’s the Garmin data for this run.

A brush with greatness

Cardiff Half Marathon faq panel

Susan Wightman, Jess Coulson, Mike McLeod, Steve Jones and Geoff Wightman

My birthday usually coincides with the Cardiff Half Marathon, which means no rock & roll style antics for me. My saving grace for something to do came from the Cardiff Half Marathon organisers: they laid on a seminar of sorts with a panel of familiar, and not so familiar, guests:

  • Steve Jones – British marathon record holder and former world record holder
  • Mike McLeod – 10,000m silver medalist of the 1984 Olympics
  • Geoff Wightman – MD of runbritain
  • Susan Wightman – Team GB marathon runner in the 1988 Olympics
  • Jess Coulson – U20 3000m England Athletics champion
  • Dewi Griffiths – Reigning Welsh Cardiff Half Marathon champion

It was an informal talk with maybe 30 people in the room (and free food!), chaired by the Cardiff Half Marathon race director, Steve Brace. One stand out moment came from an audience member:  Steve worked through the crowd to get people to share their PBs, with times from 2:15 all the way down to 1:24, when one guy pipes up and shares he has a 66 minute PB with hopes to get under 65 minutes the following day. Geoff Wightman took immediate interest as a selection committee member for the 2016 World Half Marathon Championships, but was disappointed to learn the mystery audience member had no such aspirations.

Cardiff Half Marathon 2015 review

For the full report on my 2015 Cardiff Half Marathon, please click here.

Time for another one of Mark Remy’s entries from The Runner’s Rule Book:

Save the race shirt for postrace

Wearing the official race shirt during the race is like wearing a U2 t-shirt to a U2 concert.

Not cool. Don’t do it.

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