This week’s running – 4th to 10th of July 2016

andy_yu_walsall_arboretum_parkrun

Closing my eyes on an unfamiliar course probably isn’t the best idea – photo by Ronald Reynolds

Week 9 of the 22 week marathon schedule saw me cut back slightly on volume along with getting some Parkrun tourism in.

9 miles from work with strides

The injection of some strides at the beginning of each new mile helped to prevent this run from becoming too ploddy.

Interestingly, my Fenix 3 lost its way through Brindley Place again, this time near The Cube, where it looked like I ran in a circle on the spot. I’m not surprised the Fenix 3 struggles through that particular stretch of canal with the artificial canyon, though I must say my Garmin 910XT almost never skipped a beat under identical terrain.

Here’s the Strava data for this run.

5 miles recovery from city centre

The temperature picked up once more and I was glad there was no pace target for this run in the schedule!

Here’s the Strava data for this run.

9 miles from work

This was not a good run for me, mentally, so I apologise in advance but I’m gonna have a bit of a moan. Feel free to skip this section entirely!

The original plan was to cover 9 miles from the office for home, but several things stood in my way, one of them literally.

You’ll have just read about my woes with my Garmin Fenix 3 whilst running through Brindley Place. The high walls of the canal create a canyon-like situation, which is notoriously difficult for GPS accuracy. Chuck in the tunnel that goes beneath Broad Street and it’s any wonder it stays on course at all. My issues started because these days, I’m hitting Brindley Place several miles into a run versus when I used to live in the Jewellery Quarter and the locale appeared within the first or last mile typically. Currently, I’ll be cruising through Brindley Place during the third or fourth mile of a run at a typical 7:50 per mile pace; suddenly it’ll shoot up to 7:20 or so with no intervention from me. As well as an increase in recorded speed, the Fenix 3 also suddenly thinks I’ve gone further than I actually did, due to the GPS trace going incredibly wide (sometimes, by as much as 200m). Looking at previous runs through Brindley Place recorded on my former 910XT, the GPS traces weren’t perfectly clean, though the recorded paces are better masked and smoothed out, whereas it’s almost impossible for me not to spot a 30 second pace increase on the device display. It’s the perfect storm situation where I can’t un-see what I have seen; I’m now constantly on the look-out for it!

I slotted 2 miles in at target marathon pace during the middle portion of this run, thinking it’d be a doddle to cover, but didn’t factor in the effects of the headwind that blew right into me. The first mile came in almost 10 seconds too fast due to over-compensation; the second was too slow for the opposite reason.

Disheartened, but not yet defeated, I continued on through Selly Oak when a shifty-looking bloke on a bike stopped ahead of me and started waving me down. I now make it a habit of not stopping during a run if somebody wants my attention – that’s not me being an arse, but a result of previously being stopped for all manner of stupid reasons (crowded Cannon Hill Park and man stops me for the time). Basically, if you don’t look injured, I ain’t stopping for you! Anywho, I replied with, “Sorry bud, in the middle of a run,” as if it wasn’t obvious enough. He shouted back at me with, “Wait! You can’t go that way!” He was absolutely right and maybe 100m ahead of me was a fast flowing gush of water from street level on to the towpath and into the canal itself. Fortunately, I was able to suddenly detour back on to street level through a nearby housing estate, which lead back to Oak Tree Lane and Linden Road. Running past the entrance to Raddlebarn Road, a copper had blocked the road off with his car. Water was in free-flow from one of the new housing developments on the former site of the hospital, which later turned out to be a burst water main. I eventually tracked back on my way past Cadbury’s World to come out at Stirchley, making the second half of this run much hillier than originally envisioned.

I got the distance in, but not without a few wounds…

Here’s the Strava data for this run.

Walsall Arboretum Parkrun

With Cannon Hill Parkrun closed for the first of three weeks, Simon Bull, Nigel Beecroft and I went on tour again, visiting the Walsall Arboretum event. It was over three years ago that I was last there, albeit on a temporary course in light of development around the lake; the current course on paper definitely looked faster with substantially less climb by comparison. Whilst it was never on the training schedule, I quite fancied an impromptu 5k PB attack and kept it quiet for this reason; no pressure if nobody knows about it!

Continuing the trend of a disrupted British summer, I was greeted by torrential sideways rain and had to make it over to the other side of the park as a warm-up… I quickly met up with the guys and recognised a few other fellow Cannon Hill refugees.

Much like at Arrow Valley and Cwmbran a couple of weeks ago, there was some slight nervousness inside me from the unfamiliarity – all very positive and welcome ahead of the unplanned challenge at hand. Stood on the start line, I strategically placed myself a few rows back so as to allow for people to chase down.

The start was incredibly controlled, even with people dashing off all around me. A few hundred metres later, gaps formed and I began ditching those around me to reel in those in front. Unfortunately, my recorded splits aren’t reliable because I’d set my Garmin to smart recording from Thursday’s GPS investigations… I felt pretty comfortable and that maybe, just maybe, this wasn’t to be a fools errand.

More runners from ahead were sent back to me, giving me some interim targets to focus on during lap 2. Halfway through this lap, I came into contact with the backmarkers, whom were easy enough to scoot around for no disruption to my rhythm. I stalked a solid looking group of 3 about 50m ahead. A lucky break presented itself when the group broke apart and one guy lost his flow by a couple of steps, allowing me to creep up on him. I gave him some encouragement to keep going with me, though his breathing suggested he’d reached the limits of his ability and sent me onwards into lap 3.

I think the last time I ran a true-blue 3 lap course was Wolverhampton around this time last year. I don’t handle laps all that well, and the thought of my buddy, Vince Nazareth, running a track 10,000m race later that evening sent shivers down my spine. Slowly but surely, more and more of the mid-pack runners began drifting into contact with me. It was all incredibly civilised and everybody instinctively knew to keep left on the course. The increased density of runners around me undoubtedly helped to keep the perception of speed up and keep me company, where the next group of runners were definitely too far ahead to latch on to.

About halfway through the final lap, a Shabbarunner came out of nowhere to overtake me. This was significant because it was the first time anybody had come past me since the start line! He moved at just a few strides faster and gave me the perfect opportunity to lift my pace in an attempt to match his. It was almost like we were attached at the waist by elastic; the gap grew larger and smaller as he tried to break away and I did my best to cover his moves. With only a few hundred metres remaining until the finish, the volume of lapped mid-pack runners reached its peak and I suddenly had to divide my attention between them and chasing down the Shabbarunner. The lapped runners won; approaching the narrow bridge before the long final straight, I had to shout “KEEP LEFT!” to prevent anybody drifting into my path as I teared around the corner.

The Shabbarunner’s lead grew by a few metres as he shifted into a final kick. I lifted my cadence as I tried to do the same, but I’d run out of gears to shift into due to a complete lack of 5k work in favour of 42.2k focus. Throughout the run, I felt like a simmering pot of hot water, only occasionally showing signs of bubbling over. The run didn’t feel like a traditional 5k attempt of mine and instead felt much more like an even dispersal of effort over the course – did the very flat 3 lap route play its part? I crossed the line a couple of seconds behind the Shabbarunner, who simply had more strength in the closing stage.

As per usual, I wanted to throw my guts up from the lactic acid that flooded my body. And my finish time? 18:14. 18 bloody 14! A 17 second improvement from April and a massive 35 second jump from the very end of 2015!

Here’s the Strava data for this run, though as I already mentioned above, the splits are pretty useless due to the screwy distance from having smart recording enabled versus 1 second recording… I’ve now reverted back to 1 second recording!

Breaking down the race run with Simon Rhodes afterwards, he concurred that the change of venue must’ve helped because he experienced the same when he visited the unfamiliar Cannon Hill recently, also producing his own PB away from home turf.

Obviously, I enjoyed my time at Walsall Arboretum and I’ve no doubt the course would be even faster in dry conditions, though I also have the nagging feeling that dryer conditions would have also increased the overall volume of runners; I’m not so sure the 3 lap course would have quite the same speed with increased numbers.

12 miles – to The Cube and back

Or just outside of Brindley Place, so as not to tempt the dreaded GPS drift on my Garmin!

Lis and I had a few errands to run earlier in the day, so I had to delay this run until the warm and humid mid-afternoon…

No dramatics and largely run by feel. The second half was into some aggressive headwind, though it at least cooled me down and shifted some of the sweat that was clinging to me! I picked up the pace in the final 3 miles, including the climb up Cartland Road (yeah, I can’t figure out why, either…)

Here’s the Strava data for this run.

The road to the Yorkshire Marathon

My last marathon campaign was devoid of any PBs outside of 26.2 miles. No 5k, no 10k, no half marathon. So it’s entirely bizarre, though most welcome, that I’m setting new PBs at 5k and 10k at the moment and I’m also confident I’ll break into new half marathon territory come September despite the less than ideal course.

Next week sees me back in the land of marathon specifics and potentially in 50 mile territory…

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