Conductive Education 10k 2017 review

andy_yu_conductive_education_10k_2017

Just a few hundred metres left – photo by Yvonne Morgan

For the 2016 race, please click the following:

Second outing for me and second ever 10k for Lis at this gem of a local race.

Pre-race

I’d heard of this race for several years from friends, but only took notice of it and first participated a year ago. Run almost entirely within Cannon Hill Park, the route naturally shares several similarities with the various parkrun courses of yore, so will be quite familiar to many. Naturally, there were many, many faces from the local running community, both participating and volunteering. Lis continued her focus on 10k events and also signed up, with her parents in tow to spectate.

It’s a charming little race, with the proceeds going to the NICE charity, helping children with movement disorders.

A year prior, I ran this race feeling like I’d barely worked. I was in much better all-round then, with results proving as much. From 5k up to the marathon, I felt like I could put out respectable performances without too much forewarning, such was the magnitude of the training improving all of my energy systems and paces. Recent parkruns have felt tricky, with a distinct difficulty in moving up to and staying in higher gears. A morning’s target of simply finishing in under 40 minutes was fine by me! My race strategy? Just dip under 20 minutes for the first half and race the second half like a 5k. Speaking with Chris Callow beforehand, he too sought after a sub-40 finish, not having done so since 2016’s Telford 10k, which I’d so miserably DNFd at.

The race

I’ve not done many races with fast downhill starts, so the novelty has yet to wear thin. Expectedly, everybody went bananas and used the advantage to bank a few valuable seconds early on. Once the course flattened out, I had to do a double take when I saw 3:29 per km pace being covered! I shared with Chris that I was dropping the anchors to pull back a touch, getting back on my plan of covering the first half of the race in just shy of 20 minutes. The 1st km with its generous descent came in for 3:50.

So early on in the race, there were plenty of people around me to run alongside, and coupled with my consciously scaled back pace, it all felt rather effortless. The next 2km were coasted along at 4:05 and 4:01 pace as the race took runners to the furthest point of the course.

My ability to negotiate switchbacks had not improved, especially when it involves running around a bollard! Even at a more controlled pace, I ended up grabbing the bollard with both hands to swing myself around in an attempt to not lose too much momentum for the return. Whilst my switchback talents left little to be desired, it seemed everybody else’s ahead of me was worse, because I found myself closing in on a few that had escaped me earlier.

With such a narrow path back into the main park, everybody was forced to run no more than two abreast in both directions, making for quite a useful slipstream for me to take shelter from the gusts that blew. Feedback from the other side from Neil Muir and Lis indicated I was roughly in 15th place. As the group I was following slowed and splintered, I began to move from runner to runner, resulting in a not un-welcome uptick in pace to pave the way for a 3:53 4th km. Unexpectedly, I was tailing Zack Minchin, who I hadn’t seen at Cannon Hill for months. He proved to be a reliable pacer, dragging me to halfway with a 3:51 split and 19:43 for 5km.

When those around me tired, I continued to jump from runner to runner to keep the pace from dropping too much. By my estimations, I’d moved up to 12th or 13th; placing in the top 10 was another goal alongside finishing in under 40 minutes.

With the course somewhat slick from prior rainwater, I struggled to maintain traction on a number of the tight twists and turns that were thrown my way, especially as fatigue mounted. Wearing the Nike Streak LT3 racing flats certainly required nimble feet that morning as I nearly discovered their limits a few times! 6km came in at 3:55.

Back on the long straight and heading out of the main park for the final time, I got a good glimpse of those immediately ahead of me and the leaders returning on the other side. Carl Stainton was firmly in 2nd place, with too much of a gap in front or behind him to likely change his podium position. Shaun Hemmings was in a small group for 4th, with a chance of climbing to either third or dropping down to fifth. Up ahead of me, I could see I was closing in on Darryll Thomas and the difference between us had likely reduced to just 30 – 40 seconds or so compared to the first lap.

Rounding the switchback, I once again swung myself with both hands to slingshot me for the return. Unsure of what was taking place immediately behind me, I pressed on to claim two scalps ahead. Conflicting feedback from the other side suggested I was either 7th or 8th, or just outside of the top 10. My pace sat steady and did not drift from 7km onwards for 3:54.

Just ahead of me was a BRAT runner, where the distance between us grew and shrank like an accordion. At one point, I was within 10m, and at other times, he easily had more than 50m on me.

The finish for this race was awkwardly located within some of Cannon Hill Park’s inner paths, making identification of the actual finish line and big sprint finishes quite a challenge. I’ve lost a lot of finishing power this year, and with nobody immediately in front or behind me, I could only muster a half-hearted attempt despite cheers from the side lines.

Post-race

Here’s the Strava data for this race.

I finished feeling pretty damn good and certainly better than recent parkruns at a reduced pace!

Darryll came over to share that he scored a PB by some 30 seconds or so, continuing his triumphant year of achievements (including an unexpected 1st v40 prize). It was only when he commented that I must have been close to a PB that I remembered to check my finishing time. 38:47 stared back at me – just another 3 seconds would have secured a fresh 10k best! I really had no clue I was so close, especially as I’d consigned myself to just wanting a sub-40 finish and a top 10 position, which I just sneaked into with 10th.

Carl finished in 2nd place as anticipated, agreeing that there was too much of a gap either side for a major podium shakeup. Shaun finished in 4th, improving upon a year ago by 3 minutes. Lis improved upon her 10k PB, originally set at the Wolverhampton race by some 4 minutes. Despite her protestations, I keep telling her that she’ll easily go under an hour with 2 months of consistency behind her.

Post-race thoughts

I care not that I just missed a PB by such a fine, unknown margin. I had a thoroughly enjoyable morning in the company of some fine members of the local running community, who I’m pleased did achieve PBs and prizes. Lis knocking 4 minutes off her 10k best meant the Yu household was not devoid of PBs to be celebrated.

What this race has highlighted is that I’m not in bad shape at all after the Yorkshire Marathon. Targeting 83:30 or better in January’s Brass Monkey Half Marathon doesn’t look like it’ll be a fool’s errand, with plenty of time between now and then to capitalise on the improvements from a change in stimulus, namely a focus on lactate threshold and half marathon pace. The next upcoming race will be the Sneyd Christmas Pudding 10 mile, which should prove to be a reliable gauge of potential as well as being a potent stimulus in and of itself.

 

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One thought on “Conductive Education 10k 2017 review

  1. Well done to you and esp Lis, what a fab PB. Some of the “sedate” ladies she’s been running with hit under 60 on Sunday so if she works on intervals and does some running with them for pacing, that should help. Good to see you both there and the bollard marshalling point sounds even more stressful than mine!

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